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Posts tagged: posters

"Revealing the Secrets of the Modern Movie Poster"

“Revealing the Secrets of the Modern Movie Poster”

Former graphic designer for Intralink Film Graphic Design and current Google graphic designer Alex Griendling talks about designing film posters and campaigns at The Art House.

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RIP, Anthony Goldschmidt

Graphic designer Anthony Goldschmidt has died. Goldschmidt’s company Intralink Film Graphic Design was the first to offer poster design as well as titles and trailers. Intralink created posters for countless films and Goldschmidt himself designed the titles for films including Young Frankenstein (1974), Blazing Saddles (1974) and Stargate (1994). The Hollywood Reporter, The Wrap and The Fashion…

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At The Gutter: Ushering In A New Regime: Johnnie To, Crime Films and Dissent

This week Carol writes a little more about Hong Kong film, censorship and dissent.

Last month, I wrote about British (and a little pre-People’s Republic Chinese) censorship of Hong Kong movies and the ways that wuxia and kung fu movies in particular got around British control of political speech. And now, with wuxia and kung fu movies seemingly all nationalistic, dissent has creeped into the crime films, so this month I’m going to talk about the films of Johnnie To Kei-Fung, Wai Ka-Fai and their production company, Milkyway Image. Since 1997, Hong Kong crime films have been set in pre-Handover Hong Kong (or pre-1999 Macao) because doing otherwise would imply that there are crime problems after the Handover or in China. As if anything set before 1997 were only about 1997.

At The Gutter: Blurry Images Coming Clear: Hong Kong Cinema, Censorship and Me

This week, Carol writes about Hong Kong movies, subtitles and censorship:

"[W]hen I started watching Hong Kong movies (projected in their correct aspect ratios and with no unintentional decapitations), I started wondering why they came pre-subtitled. Chinese subtitles do automatically expand the market for Cantonese films beyond Cantonese-speaking communities. And English subtitles were nice for me. But it turns out that British colonial authorities wanted to keep an eye on Chinese film. In 1963, the Hong Kong Legislative Council passed a law requiring that all films be subtitled in English. (Stokes & Hoover, 25). The British had been concerned with the possiblity of film fomenting dissent and hostility towards Europeans since the beginning of the Chinese film industry, but between 1919 and 1963, Hong Kong censors had examined, cut, and banned thousands of films without necessarily understanding Cantonese or Mandarin."

(Thai poster for No One Can Touch Her (1979) via Kung Fu Movie Posters)

At The Gutter: Hebrew Horrors

SF/F Editor Keith Allison explores Jewish folklore and horror cinema.

To enumerate the number of horror films that draw from Christian folklore and mysticism would result in a list long enough to qualify as a tome. To do similarly with Buddhist and Taoist folklore would result in much the same, only with a lot more Lam Ching-ying doing backflips. But if you turn the horrific cinema lens on the rich ocean of Jewish folklore, you come up with almost nothing. Oh sure, every now and then a rabbi totters on-screen to help out a priest with some esoteric passage in the Old Testament, but that is Judaism in the service of Christianity, rather than Judaism on its own tackling its own assortment of ghosts and monsters and legends.

drfreex:

As long as I’m doing fan service, I might as well take care of Jess, too.

drfreex:

As long as I’m doing fan service, I might as well take care of Jess, too.

piratepub:

Launching Today: NOIR CARNIVAL!


 Buy it now!!

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piratepub:

Launching Today: NOIR CARNIVAL!

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image
Buy it now!!

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Ghanian Film PostersHand-painted film posters from Ghana, West Africa, including local films as well as Master of…View Post

Ghanian Film Posters

Hand-painted film posters from Ghana, West Africa, including local films as well as Master of…

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At The Gutter: Xanadu’s Persistence of Memory

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Guest Star Less Lee Moore remembers Xanadu:

I watched Xanadu on HBO dozens of times in the early 1980s. My obsession also included the soundtrack, which I listened to on a Walkman while attired in scarves, leotards, ruffled skirts, and legwarmers. Sadly, my skills at ballet, tap, and jazz did not translate into roller skating, so I pretended I was Olivia Newton-John by twirling around my grandmother’s carport. It pains me how much Xanadu was savaged by critics then and mocked by movie fans over the last 33 years. Sure, there are a lot of corny bits, but I think Xanadu is a truly postmodern film.