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Posts tagged: poetry

"Leave No Black Plume As A Token: Tracing Poe’s Raven"

“Leave No Black Plume As A Token: Tracing Poe’s Raven”

At Atlas Obscura, J.W. Ocker writes about Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven” in monuments, memorials, artifacts and ephemera. “I spent more than a year visiting memorials, mementos, monuments, and more dedicated or connected to Edgar Allan Poe in the places he lived and visited. That meant traveling from Massachusetts all the way down to an island in South Carolina, as well as across the Atlantic,…

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"Le Bestiare Fabuleux"

“Le Bestiare Fabuleux”

“A mid-20th century collaboration between artists, poets and printers gave rise to a unique book of surrealistic creatures accompanied by complementary typographic art poems.” See more at BibliOdyssey. (Thanks, Andrezo!)

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At The Gutter: A Monster Saved From Monster’s Ways

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Comics Editor Carol writes about a Sea Mutant torn between a taste for teens and a love of Shakespeare:

As Romance Editor Chris Szego has often noted here at The Gutter, the theme of modern romance is that the hero can change. But what about sea mutants—can they change? In Jonathan Cases’s Dear Creature (Tor, 2011) a sea mutant falls in love with a human woman. It’s a beautifully-drawn and beautifully-written Shakespearean comedy with a monster or a Sixties monster beach movie in iambic pentameter with a sea mutant named Grue, a woman named Giulietta and a chorus of crabs urging Grue to consume people.

(Jonathan Case also provided the art for The Green River Killer and is currently drawing, Batman ‘66).

A Monster Saved From Monster’s Ways
As Romance Editor Chris Szego has often noted here at

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A Monster Saved From Monster’s Ways


As Romance Editor Chris Szego has often noted here at

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thenearsightedmonkey:

Twenty students in The Unthinkable Mind class were told they had a week to memorize Emily Dickinson’s Poem #530.

Two days later, before most of them had started working on it they were asked write down what they could remember of the poem.

QUESTION: What traces does a poem leave behind after one has read it only once or twice?

Poem # 530

You cannot put a Fire out -- A Thing that can ignite Can go, itself, without a Fan -- Upon the slowest Night -- You cannot fold a Flood -- And put it in a Drawer -- Because the Winds would find it out -- And tell your Cedar Floor --
thenearsightedmonkey:

Jeff the Fly shares his poetry.

thenearsightedmonkey:

Jeff the Fly shares his poetry.