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Posts tagged: martial arts

ruckawriter:

art-of-swords:

Evaluating A Replica Sword to Purchase, or “So You Want To Buy A Sword”
By John Clements, ARMA Director
Shopping for a sword is something like buying a new car. You want one that looks good, that serves your needs, that identifies with who you are, and you don’t want to end up paying too much for it or buying a lemon. But just as with a car you can buy from reputable manufacturers or those with inconstant or dubious reputations.
You can hear opinions of people who will swear for or against one sword maker or sword model. You will encounter honest presentations, promotional hype, marketing fiction, sincere exaggeration, simple deception, and outright lies. You will encounter facts and myths, accuracy and nonsense.
Never forget that some people just don’t know all the information they should and other people may not even want you to have all the information to make a sound discussion that best serves your spending dollars. Some manufacturers make and sell the only product they can, regardless of its quality.
They might even intentionally cut corners or choose lower grade materials and the cheapest processes. Others may take a route that produces the best product at a higher cost. As with any market, there are high end and low end products as well as several levels of quality in between.
For many enthusiasts today, buying a sword is a hit or miss experience. This is based on many subjective and objective sources of information, including: word of mouth (those we’ve talked to who’ve bought something), rumor and anecdote (what we read or that someone says they’ve heard), personal experience (what we already own or have handled), and the statements and claims of manufacturers and dealers (often questionable).
Evaluating all this information can be overwhelming without a firm understanding of the qualities and attributes that go into a good sword. After all, a piece of metal that is shaped like a sword and has a handle does not necessary make a real “sword”.
So, when deciding upon what sword there are a few essential elements for decision making…
[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Info source: Copyright 2014 © The Association for Renaissance Martial Arts | Photo source: Copyright 2014 © Peter Johnsson


Important information for the discerning bladesperson.

ruckawriter:

art-of-swords:

Evaluating A Replica Sword to Purchase, or “So You Want To Buy A Sword”

Shopping for a sword is something like buying a new car. You want one that looks good, that serves your needs, that identifies with who you are, and you don’t want to end up paying too much for it or buying a lemon. But just as with a car you can buy from reputable manufacturers or those with inconstant or dubious reputations.

You can hear opinions of people who will swear for or against one sword maker or sword model. You will encounter honest presentations, promotional hype, marketing fiction, sincere exaggeration, simple deception, and outright lies. You will encounter facts and myths, accuracy and nonsense.

Never forget that some people just don’t know all the information they should and other people may not even want you to have all the information to make a sound discussion that best serves your spending dollars. Some manufacturers make and sell the only product they can, regardless of its quality.

They might even intentionally cut corners or choose lower grade materials and the cheapest processes. Others may take a route that produces the best product at a higher cost. As with any market, there are high end and low end products as well as several levels of quality in between.

For many enthusiasts today, buying a sword is a hit or miss experience. This is based on many subjective and objective sources of information, including: word of mouth (those we’ve talked to who’ve bought something), rumor and anecdote (what we read or that someone says they’ve heard), personal experience (what we already own or have handled), and the statements and claims of manufacturers and dealers (often questionable).

Evaluating all this information can be overwhelming without a firm understanding of the qualities and attributes that go into a good sword. After all, a piece of metal that is shaped like a sword and has a handle does not necessary make a real “sword”.

So, when deciding upon what sword there are a few essential elements for decision making…

[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Info source: Copyright 2014 © The Association for Renaissance Martial Arts | Photo source: Copyright 2014 © Peter Johnsson

Important information for the discerning bladesperson.

Happy Year of the Snake from The Five Deadly Venoms and the Wu Tang Clan!

one of my all time favorite kung fu comedies.

one of my all time favorite kung fu comedies.

Brigitte Lin Ching-Hsia as Asia in Swordsman II, the Victor Victoria of wuxia movies. Last genderqueer picture from HK cinema today, I promise.

Brigitte Lin Ching-Hsia as Asia in Swordsman II, the Victor Victoria of wuxia movies. Last genderqueer picture from HK cinema today, I promise.

Genderqueer fun for Pride! Lam Ching-Ying as a Peking Opera artist who specializes in female roles and teaches Yuen Biao to fight in Prodigal Son. Also, no tragedy, just fighting!

Genderqueer fun for Pride! Lam Ching-Ying as a Peking Opera artist who specializes in female roles and teaches Yuen Biao to fight in Prodigal Son. Also, no tragedy, just fighting!

Windy confronts Yang in Kagan McLeod’s Infinite Kung Fu. One of the panels from this was used in Comics Editor Carol’s piece on IKF.
Read a preview of IKF here.

Windy confronts Yang in Kagan McLeod’s Infinite Kung Fu. One of the panels from this was used in Comics Editor Carol’s piece on IKF.

Read a preview of IKF here.

softfilm:

orientallyyours:

Cantonese opera actor, Kwan Duk Hing, as a cowboy in the 1930s. Image from the University of California’s Museum of Performance and Design, Performing Arts Library. 

Kwan Tak-hing 關德興 is best remembered for playing the Cantonese folk hero Wong Fei-hung 黃飛鴻 in a prolific and long-running series of Hong Kong films during the 1950s and 60s. This photo iss from the early 1930s when he was performing Cantonese Opera in San Francisco Chinatown.

softfilm:

orientallyyours:

Cantonese opera actor, Kwan Duk Hing, as a cowboy in the 1930s. Image from the University of California’s Museum of Performance and Design, Performing Arts Library. 

Kwan Tak-hing 關德興 is best remembered for playing the Cantonese folk hero Wong Fei-hung 黃飛鴻 in a prolific and long-running series of Hong Kong films during the 1950s and 60s. This photo iss from the early 1930s when he was performing Cantonese Opera in San Francisco Chinatown.

Flyer from the late Kung Fu Fridays film program in Toronto. Strangely enough the date for this screening coincides with tonight’s Drive-In Mob Chow Yun-Fat Heroic Bloodshed Double Feature!

Kung Fu Fridays was programmed by current Toronto International Film Festival programmer and ActionFest Director, Colin Geddes. This particular flyer is from when the series was in its nomadic years before it found its home at the Royal. And, this particular screening was held in a theater that mostly showed porn at the time, leading passersby to wonder at the long line outside and down the block.

(from Carol Borden’s collection of ephemera)

Tom Hardy’s Back and Front

Tom Hardy’s front.