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Posts tagged: illustration

Heart of Darkness, A Drawing For Every Page

Heart of Darkness, A Drawing For Every Page

Tin House has published an edition of Joseph Conrad’s Heart Of Darkness illustrated by Matt Kish, an interesting follow-up to Kish’s project, Moby-Dick In Pictures; One Drawing For Every Page. See more of Kish’s work here.

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meganlynnkott:

As some of you may or may not know…  I painted ALL of the Maximum Fun podcast hosts as cats.  As MaxFun is mid-stream in their annual pledge drive: if you like their shows, I ask you to go and visit them and donate what you can.  Because much like the idea behind Image comics, they believe that if you make something, you should get money for the thing you make.
And if you donate $10 a month you can get the 18 month calendar of all my MaxFun kitty paintings.  Which is, to toot my own horn, pretty rad.
And you don’t have to take my word for it, Judge John Hodgcat implores you: don’t don’t donate.  #dodonate !!! @jessethorn @hodgman

meganlynnkott:

As some of you may or may not know…  I painted ALL of the Maximum Fun podcast hosts as cats.  As MaxFun is mid-stream in their annual pledge drive: if you like their shows, I ask you to go and visit them and donate what you can.  Because much like the idea behind Image comics, they believe that if you make something, you should get money for the thing you make.

And if you donate $10 a month you can get the 18 month calendar of all my MaxFun kitty paintings.  Which is, to toot my own horn, pretty rad.

And you don’t have to take my word for it, Judge John Hodgcat implores you: don’t don’t donate.  #dodonate !!! @jessethorn @hodgman

fer1972:

Lord of the Rings illustrated by Frank Frazetta in 1975

At The Gutter: The Turn Of The Tale

Romance Editor Chris shares some of her favorite fairy tale retellings.

When it comes to fairy tales, I’m no purist. I love re-tellings, revisions, old favourites made new and strange. That, I think, is what I liked best about Frozen: it took the bare idea of the Snow Queen and told a completely different story, albeit one in which we can vaguely recognize the original. And that reminded me of some of my favourite fairy tale retellings… and how  so many of them are love stories.

Image, “Beauty and the Beast” by Walter Crane. Via "Grimm Girls: Picturing the Princess."

At The Gutter: Frozen: Jane Austen Meets The Snow Queen

What happens when a woman who dislikes Disney watches Frozen? So much Jane Austen. And also some Cornel West.

My mom raised me with three things: Feminism; “You don’t have to like your sister, but you can’t hit her”; and a dislike of Disney. Writing them down now, I realize that all three are more applicable to Frozen, than I thought when I decided I should state my bias. I respect Disney’s progress in representation, so every  five years or so, I watch a Disney animated feature. I’d heard good things about Frozen from women on the internet, so last holiday season I became Holiday Season Carol and went to see Frozen with some friends, just like people do. But instead of really focusing on feminism and Disney, now all I really want to talk about is sisters and Jane Austen.

image: Joey Chou’s art for the Anna’s Act of Love/ Elsa’s Icy Magic picture book.

At The Gutter: The Stephen King Universe

SF/F Editor Emeritus James Schellenberg returns to The Gutter this week as a Guest Star and continues his exploration of Stephen King’s Dark Tower series:

You can easily glance off the top of any book by Stephen King–get a few frights and move on. But there’s a hidden world beneath almost all of his books, and not only is it frightening, it’s incredibly intricate (see this flow chart). I revisited King’s Dark Tower series and some of the related books, and while I’m not entirely sure it was worth it, here are a few things that struck me.

(Illustration from The Wind Through The Keyhole by Jae Lee)

drfreex:

As long as I’m doing fan service, I might as well take care of Jess, too.

drfreex:

As long as I’m doing fan service, I might as well take care of Jess, too.

At The Gutter: Strong. Women.

image

Romance Editor Chris has some things to say about strength and strong female characters.

Ever have one of those months in which several disparate threads from different aspects of your life all suddenly seem to be part of the same cloth? I’m having one right now. The recent truly excellent articles by carol and alex combined with the current interwebs-fueled firestorm over ‘fake geek girls’ and the collective cognitive failure of the Texas legislature have combined to give me some deeper insight into why I so dislike the ever-growing trend of the ‘kick-ass’ Romance heroine.  More specifically, the way ‘kick-ass’ has become the default instead of ‘strong’.

The kick-ass heroine possesses at least moderate physical skill, often carries a weapon, and tends towards snark. She’s usually in leather clothing and/or stompy boots (and probably has a tattoo or two).  To be clear: there’s nothing wrong with any of those attributes, taken singly or even together. But the combination is now so prevalent that it’s become the standard of  ‘strong heroine’ when it is only one example of what is truly an infinite variety -and not the most interesting at that. The clothes, the one-liners, the boots: those are just accessories.  A character isn’t strong because of how tough she looks, or talks, or even how many punches she takes:  she is strong because of what she does.

"Strength" from the Visconti Tarot Deck (15th Century)

Hayakawa SF Magazine (1968). If anyone knows the illustrator, I’ll be glad to add their name.

Hayakawa SF Magazine (1968). If anyone knows the illustrator, I’ll be glad to add their name.