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Posts tagged: illustration

"Revealing the Secrets of the Modern Movie Poster"

“Revealing the Secrets of the Modern Movie Poster”

Former graphic designer for Intralink Film Graphic Design and current Google graphic designer Alex Griendling talks about designing film posters and campaigns at The Art House.

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RIP, Anthony Goldschmidt

Graphic designer Anthony Goldschmidt has died. Goldschmidt’s company Intralink Film Graphic Design was the first to offer poster design as well as titles and trailers. Intralink created posters for countless films and Goldschmidt himself designed the titles for films including Young Frankenstein (1974), Blazing Saddles (1974) and Stargate (1994). The Hollywood Reporter, The Wrap and The Fashion…

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bluebed:

A massive spread and a ton of smaller illustrations I made for a delightful story by Gideon Lewis-Kraus in the current issue of Lucky Peach.

For the spread I referenced Pirosmani and a few other Georgian painters, for the spots I followed Gideon’s perambulations, and for the recipes I drew some goofy vegetables and herbs.

I always try to find a personal connection to an extensive assignment like this one, and having a well-written text and a relevant theme justifies my slightly torturous process (yes, each little shape is hand-drawn with brush & ink). Speaking of process, I recently had a video chat about it with Matthew the Horse.

In my youth I’d endured a great deal of such daylong feasts, brought on by my immigrant family to distract us from the reality of Russia of the 80s-90s. Both our steaming brightlit kitchen and the vast grey outside instilled in me the doubling sense of alienation that I still carry with me in my breast pocket. During my last trip to Moscow, after a customary daylong feast, I wondered at the foreignness I suddenly felt about the place, as if I was visiting an exotic land after reading about it for a bit too long. I realized that the last five years distanced the country of my psyche that I still live in from the country that remained, distanced it enough to make me feel like I was taking a tour of an ineptly choreographed reconstruction of my own past. It was that, or plain indigestion.

Thanks AD Walter for the assignment and for the typographical treatment!

scificovers:

Thrilling Wonder Stories, June 1943. Cover by Earle Bergey.

scificovers:

Thrilling Wonder Stories, June 1943. Cover by Earle Bergey.

Heart of Darkness, A Drawing For Every Page

Heart of Darkness, A Drawing For Every Page

Tin House has published an edition of Joseph Conrad’s Heart Of Darkness illustrated by Matt Kish, an interesting follow-up to Kish’s project, Moby-Dick In Pictures; One Drawing For Every Page. See more of Kish’s work here.

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meganlynnkott:

As some of you may or may not know…  I painted ALL of the Maximum Fun podcast hosts as cats.  As MaxFun is mid-stream in their annual pledge drive: if you like their shows, I ask you to go and visit them and donate what you can.  Because much like the idea behind Image comics, they believe that if you make something, you should get money for the thing you make.
And if you donate $10 a month you can get the 18 month calendar of all my MaxFun kitty paintings.  Which is, to toot my own horn, pretty rad.
And you don’t have to take my word for it, Judge John Hodgcat implores you: don’t don’t donate.  #dodonate !!! @jessethorn @hodgman

meganlynnkott:

As some of you may or may not know…  I painted ALL of the Maximum Fun podcast hosts as cats.  As MaxFun is mid-stream in their annual pledge drive: if you like their shows, I ask you to go and visit them and donate what you can.  Because much like the idea behind Image comics, they believe that if you make something, you should get money for the thing you make.

And if you donate $10 a month you can get the 18 month calendar of all my MaxFun kitty paintings.  Which is, to toot my own horn, pretty rad.

And you don’t have to take my word for it, Judge John Hodgcat implores you: don’t don’t donate.  #dodonate !!! @jessethorn @hodgman

fer1972:

Lord of the Rings illustrated by Frank Frazetta in 1975

At The Gutter: The Turn Of The Tale

Romance Editor Chris shares some of her favorite fairy tale retellings.

When it comes to fairy tales, I’m no purist. I love re-tellings, revisions, old favourites made new and strange. That, I think, is what I liked best about Frozen: it took the bare idea of the Snow Queen and told a completely different story, albeit one in which we can vaguely recognize the original. And that reminded me of some of my favourite fairy tale retellings… and how  so many of them are love stories.

Image, “Beauty and the Beast” by Walter Crane. Via "Grimm Girls: Picturing the Princess."

At The Gutter: Frozen: Jane Austen Meets The Snow Queen

What happens when a woman who dislikes Disney watches Frozen? So much Jane Austen. And also some Cornel West.

My mom raised me with three things: Feminism; “You don’t have to like your sister, but you can’t hit her”; and a dislike of Disney. Writing them down now, I realize that all three are more applicable to Frozen, than I thought when I decided I should state my bias. I respect Disney’s progress in representation, so every  five years or so, I watch a Disney animated feature. I’d heard good things about Frozen from women on the internet, so last holiday season I became Holiday Season Carol and went to see Frozen with some friends, just like people do. But instead of really focusing on feminism and Disney, now all I really want to talk about is sisters and Jane Austen.

image: Joey Chou’s art for the Anna’s Act of Love/ Elsa’s Icy Magic picture book.