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Posts tagged: history

The Cruelty of Idiocracy

At Paleofuture, Matt Novak writes about Idiocracy‘s unpleasant implications: “Sure. As an over-the-top comedic dystopia, the movie is actually enjoyable. But the movie’s introduction makes it an unnerving reference to toss around as our go-to insult….Unlike other films that satirize the media and the soul-crushing consequences of sensationalized entertainment (my personal favorite being 1951’s Ac…

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RIP, Massimo Vignelli

Designer Massimo Vignelli has died. Fast Company Design, The Smithsonian Magazine and The New York Times have obituaries. The Verge shares a gallery of his work from the New York subway system map to Bloomingdale’s bags to American Airlines’ logo. Here Vignelli talks about design and his career.

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"Deadly Art of Survival"

“Deadly Art of Survival”

The Gutter’s own Keith writes about No Wave, Black cinema, ninjas, kung fu, cultural sharing, cultural appropriation, music and New York in a piece on The Deadly Art of Survival for Teleport City. “Its curious place in the history of cinema, for instance, [is] as this weird amalgamation of no wave, black cinema, and martial arts cinema. Or the way it is ingrained into the fabric of New York…

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"America, Be Seated!"

“America, Be Seated!”

The Smithsonian Magazine‘s Vicky Gan looks at “The Story Behind the Failed Minstrel Show at the 1964 World’s Fair.”“Remarkably, the musical received support from the NAACP. The organization, understandably turned off by the minstrel show label, was critical of the production at first, but after seeing a Boston preview NAACP officials reversed their stance, praising the revue as an ‘asset for…

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forgottenantiquities:

“In the mid 1800s, bottles of Laudanum (Opium bulbs in liquor) was an advertised remedy that would even have dosages for toddlers.”

forgottenantiquities:

In the mid 1800s, bottles of Laudanum (Opium bulbs in liquor) was an advertised remedy that would even have dosages for toddlers.”

"Cambodia’s Lost Rock’n’Roll

“Cambodia’s Lost Rock’n’Roll

Al-Jazeera America profiles John Pirozzi’s Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten, a documentary about Cambodian rock’n’roll and musicians who survived the Khmer Rouge. “Until 1975, music thrived in Phnom Penh, with clubs full night after night, crowds gathering in the streets around transistor radios to hear the latest releases, and the biggest stars being feted by the king. Enter the Khmer Rouge, communism…

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