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Posts tagged: germany

The History of the Eye Close-Up

The History of the Eye Close-Up

At RogerEbert.com, Alan Zilberman explores the history of the eye in cinema from Carl Theodor Dreyer’s The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) to Mark Cahill’s I Origins (2014). (via Matt Zoller Seitz)

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Stale Candy, Punk Rock, Failure, Assimilation and Punisher: War Zone

Stale Candy, Punk Rock, Failure, Assimilation and Punisher: War Zone

Screen Shot 2014-07-17 at 5.51.38 PMLast summer, the repairman who came to patch my kitchen ceiling, discovered I read comics and then kept asking me about different blockbuster superhero movies and shows. And I’d keep saying I wasn’t very interested. He stood on the ladder, shaking his head in a reverie, saying the superhero movies were like candy to him and “I can’t get enough.” Then je explained that Superman was boring and…

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RIP, Carla Laemmle

Actor and dancer Carla Laemmle has died. She appeared in The Phantom of the Opera (1925), Dracula (1931) and The Broadway Melody (1929). Laemmle returned to film with The Vampire Hunters Club (2001).  The New York Times, The Hollywood Reporter and The Los Angeles Times have obituaries. Here Laemmle is interviewed by her niece. And here she is interviewed by Leonard Maltinat the 2012 TCM Film…

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Pirates On One Hand, Privateers On The Other

Pirates On One Hand, Privateers On The Other

Director Lexi Alexander writes about movies and piracy and wonders if studios are more damaging.“I would argue that releasing crappy movies has a far greater effect on the film industry bottom line than piracy ever could. Similar things happen when a hyped TV show bombs or an anticipated game is a letdown. Companies don’t rise and fall due to piracy, but they do based on the quality of the…

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Global Pop Offensive!

Friend of the Gutter, Todd from Die, Danger, Die, Die, Kill! joins the Pop Offensive to share two hours of fine global pop. Listen here.

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thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Unthinkable Mind Students,

Works in progress are beautiful things. These images make me think of your composition notebooks.

Love from,

Professor Old Skull

booksnbuildings:

“Selected pages from the Spätgotisches Musterbuch des Stephan Schriber, a manuscript which appears to be some kind of sketchbook, belonging to a 15th century monk working in South-West Germany, where ideas and layouts for illuminated manuscripts were tried out and skills developed.”

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Screen captures from The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (1933), directed by Fritz Lang, adapted from Norbert Jacques’ novels by Thea von Harbou.

Rudolf Klein-Rogge as Dr. Mabuse in The Testament Of Dr. Mabuse (1933)

Rudolf Klein-Rogge as Dr. Mabuse in The Testament Of Dr. Mabuse (1933)

cinephilearchive:

Christmas greetings from Fritz Lang and the crew of Metropolis

cinephilearchive:

Christmas greetings from Fritz Lang and the crew of Metropolis