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Posts tagged: games

Thoughts on Trolls

At PBS Idea Channel, Mike considers and then reconsiders the beneficial effects of trolls. At Kill Screen, Matthew Byrd writes about the integration of trolling into a multiplayer online gaming experience, particularly with DayZ and Demon’s Soul. (Thanks, Edie!)

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Default Setting

In writing about Watch Dogs, Samantha Allan discusses white male characters as a default setting in games: “Games released at the start of a console cycle (like Bungie’s Halo: Combat Evolved for the original Xbox) tend to push the technical characteristics of gaming forward, while trotting out the same staid characters and story lines. Late in a console cycle, publishers will take ‘risks’ on…

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Interview with Brandon Dillon

Interview with Brandon Dillon

Laura Hudson talks with the creator of the game Hack’n’Slash, Brandon Dillon: “Over at WIRED, I wrote about the new game Hack n’ Slash, a Legend of Zeldastyle game where you use your sword to hack the source code itself. It’s a really clever concept, but the game has something else that Zelda never had, despite its name: a female protagonist. This didn’t make it in the article, but I really…

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Talking about fans of Lara is an interesting thing, because she’s a whole new woman now, you know? She was an icon that was really useful for women to own in the nineties and later, even though she was very heavily geared toward a male audience at the time. But the audience evolves, the business evolves, and she’s a new person now. Fans of the game are invested in her heroics, they appreciate that she’s not hypersexualized, that she’s more sophisticated and human. And maybe you lose some of the dudes who didn’t want that, but I believe Square Enix made that choice to make a better character. You know, also with Buffy, things evolve. The version of feminism that’s presented through a fantasy character is different now than it was in 1998, when we first started doing the comics. There’ve been a couple things in the comics that I’ve had to steer the writers and artists away from, to which they’ve very legitimately responded, “But wasn’t that in the show?” And it was, but things change. This is the Buffy of 2014 (or whatever year it is in the comic itself, shhhh), and this is the Lara of 2014, and I’m proud of that. I like presenting these images of heroines, as opposed to some of the other ones in our industry.

Dark Horse Editor in Chief Scott Allie speaking with The Mary Sue about women in comics. Lots more at the link. (via themarysue)

Just part of my fantastic in-depth interview with Dark Horse about women in comics. More to come tomorrow!

(via thebirdandthebat)

At The Gutter: Vengeful Gods And Other Simulated Life Failures

Screen Editor alex becomes a Vengeful God (and Comics Editor Carol becomes a tyrannical mayor) in simulated life games:

When it comes to raising a child who can use words and interact with other humans, so far I seem to be succeeding, but I have to admit that my track record prior to this was not exactly promising. Aside from managing to keep an egg safe for a week in middle school, my first attempt at virtual parenthood was a joint effort with comics editor Carol Borden in the initial release of the game Creatures in the late 90s. We had fun, but we failed.

At The Gutter: Retrospective: Vive Le Gutter!

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Ten years ago this week, Jim Munroe posted a manifesto on gutter culture and The Cultural Gutter’s been expanding on it ever since.

A few years back I started getting really interested in video games–playing them, making them, talking about them. And I noticed that there were marked similarities in people’s cultural perception of video games and science fiction.

I would talk with my friends about my experiences with video games in the same way that I’d talk about a movie or another piece of art: “In most games, you smash open a crate, you get either weapons or supplies that you can pick up, or it’ll be empty. But in Half-Life, even the empty crates have something–you get this randomized pile of computer parts motherboards or whatever, it’s a great touch.”

My appreciation for a game’s detailing, tone, and visceral engagement would usually get a laugh despite my sincerity. The disparity between applying high art analysis to low art, or even talking sincerely about something so frivolous, was a clear violation of mainstream cultural norms.

And I like violating those norms.