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Posts tagged: SUPERVILLAINS

colsmi:

Just lovely: Roger Langridge’s The Kirby Alphabet, with everyone from Kamandi to the Puppet Master, Big Barda to the King himself. (As first published in the UKCAC98 booklet.)

colsmi:

Just lovely: Roger Langridge’s The Kirby Alphabet, with everyone from Kamandi to the Puppet Master, Big Barda to the King himself. (As first published in the UKCAC98 booklet.)

gailsimone:

So true.

gailsimone:

So true.

via @profmdwhite

5 Sexy Supervillains by Evan Munday. They’re available as a postcard set in our Gutter-A-Go-Go Raids Again campaign!

Please consider donating and get some fine pin-ups while supporting thoughtful writing about disreputable art! There are only a few days left.

Screen captures from The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (1933), directed by Fritz Lang, adapted from Norbert Jacques’ novels by Thea von Harbou.

At The Gutter: The Empire of Crime: Mabuse vs. Wertham vs. Marston

This week Comics Editor Carol watches The Testament of Dr. Mabuse and thinks about Fredric Wertham and William Moulton Marston.

I had a strange flash of insight while watching The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (1933). I had intended to use the film with my article about comics’ new crime wave, but I was haunted by resonances, so many that once I started writing I had almost two articles worth of material. So his month I offer a strange mix of mad scientists imagined and real—a fictional psychoanalyst and real mental health professionals seeking to perfect or protect society: Dr. Mabuse on one side, Dr. William Moulton Marston on the other and Dr. Fredric Wertham right in the middle. All with manifestos they believe will change–or destroy–the world.

comicbookcosplay:

Julie Wilhelm as Killer Moth (DC Comics, first appearance 1963)
Photography: Gary Strange
Submitted by Julie Wilhelm

comicbookcosplay:

Julie Wilhelm as Killer Moth (DC Comics, first appearance 1963)

Photography: Gary Strange

Submitted by Julie Wilhelm

Favorite DC Couple: The Case for Harley and Ivy

dcwomenkickingass:

I asked for guest posts making the case for the finalists for the Favorite DC Couples matches and reader Natalie Reed sent me this on Harley and Ivy. Her thoughts follow:

Before I begin, I suppose I should admit a slight bias: I’m not entirely of the opinion that Harley and Ivy’s clandestine tryst was precisely “non-canon”. More like “quasi-canon”. Or “deutero-canon”. Or “scholarly confirmed apocrypha”. And if you go by the whole Word Of Authorial God theory, it was straight-up, well, canon (at least for a given value of Paul Dini’s godhood; and regarding Harley’s infamous statement that her immunity to Ivy’s toxicity was granted so they could “play” together).

Basically, unlike the vast majority of non-canon ships, whereby fans go out seeking sexy (or not-so-sexy) subtext between two characters who seem to pair well together, what was going on between Harley and Ivy was, as often as not, just plain old text. The writers planting those seeds (no pun intended) weren’t simply toying (no pun intended) with us, they were quite deliberately implying a relationship there, and moreover implying a relationship that had a pretty meaningful impact on the story. And on at least one occasion I can think of (Ivy’s confrontation with Harley in Arkham during the finale of Gotham City Sirens), those seeds bore fruit, and became a meaningful, climactic element to the narrative.

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Happy Valentine’s Day! The Brain and Monsieur Mallah finally admit their love for one another. What could be more romantic? 

Happy Valentine’s Day! The Brain and Monsieur Mallah finally admit their love for one another. What could be more romantic?