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Posts tagged: Crime

RIP, David Hannay

Producer David Hannay has died. Hannay is probably best known for Dragon Flies / The Man From Hong Kong (1975), The Kung Fu Killers (1974) and Mapantsula (1987).  The Sydney Morning Herald, NZ Edge and IF.com.au have obituaries. Jon Hewitt remembers Hannay at SBS. Brian Trenchard-Smith remembers Hannay on Hannay’s Facebook page. Hannay speaks at the The National Film and Sound Archive of…

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RIP, Lorenzo Semple

Screenwriter and creator of the Sixties Batman television series Lorenzo Semple has died. Besides Batman, Gutter readers might know Semple best from his screenplays for, The Parallax View, Flash Gordon (1980), Papillon, The Drowning Pool, Never Say Never Again, Sheena, and King Kong (1976). The Los Angeles TimesThe Hollywood Reporter and Comics Alliancehave obituaries. Semple also hosted the…

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RIP, James Rebhorn

Actor James Rebhorn has died. The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, and The Hollywood Reporter have obituaries. Rebhorn had roles in films including Independence Day, Basic Instinct, The Talented Mr. Ripley and He Knows You’re Alone. And he had roles in television shows including, Search for Tomorrow, Guiding Light, As The World Turns, Wiseguy, Third Watch, Law & Order, White Collar and Hom…

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At The Gutter: Thieves to the Left of Me, Killers to the Right

Romance Editor Chris takes a look at the bad boys of romance—“I’m talking about the seriously bad. The criminal.”

That’s a tough character choice.  The writer has to make someone who already has already demonstrated that he has no respect for the law and by extension, public welfare, into the hero.  That’s hard going. Thing is, when it works, it works really REALLY well.

Image via Existential Ennui

Old Crime Photos in a New ContextMarc Hermann superimposes historic NY Daily News crime photos onto contemporary photosof the same…View Post

Old Crime Photos in a New Context

Marc Hermann superimposes historic NY Daily News crime photos onto contemporary photosof the same…

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teleportcity:

Nick and Nora

Noir CarnivalStep right up–Noir Carnival is now available for your reading pleasure! Nineteen stories–”a heady…View Post

Noir Carnival

Step right up–Noir Carnival is now available for your reading pleasure! Nineteen stories–”a heady…

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cinephilearchive:

Unseen photos from Point Blank part 7

John Boorman’s 1967 thriller “Point Blank” is one of my favourite films, and I’ve managed to collect dozens and dozens of original contact sheets from the film. Over the next few weeks I intend to share the best of these (never before published) stills. —Jordan Krug, the edit room floor

Unseen photos from Point Blank part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4, part 5, part 6

Walter Hill just mentioned recently how much Point Blank screenplay by Alex Jacobs influenced him.

In an interview for Patrick McGilligan in Backstory 4, Walter Hill talked about the “revelation” of reading Alex Jacob’s script for John Boorman’s 1967 classic Point Blank. Hill had been laboring as a screenwriter, but was never comfortable with the template most Hollywood scripts required of him, which he said was “a sub-literary blueprint for shooting a picture and generally had no personal voice.” Hill admired Point Blank greatly, but on the page, Jacob’s work showed him a new way of writing: “Laconic, elliptical, suggestive rather than explicit, bold in the implied editorial style.” And from that example, Hill’s own writing—and later, directing—took on what he calls an almost “haiku-like” economy. At Hill’s best, his work as writer and director is as tight as a clenched fist, with not a word wasted in the dialogue and a simplicity of expression that extends from character development to the diamond-tight action sequences on which he built his reputation. —Walter Hill 101: The Auteur

“Alex Jacob’s script of Point Blank (1967) was a revelation. He was a friend (wonderful guy, looked like a pirate, funny and crazy). This revelation came about despite a character flaw of mine. I have always had difficulty being complimentary to people whose work I admire, when face-to-face with them. This is not the norm in Hollywood where effusiveness is generally a given. Anyway, a mutual friend told Alex how much I admired Point Blank and John Boorman. Alex then very graciously gave me a copy of the script. This was about the time he was doing The Seven-Ups (1973).

“Anyway, by now I’d been making a living as a screenwriter for maybe two or three years and had gotten to the point where I was dissatisfied with the standard form scripts were written in — they just all seemed to be a kind of subliterary blueprint for shooting a picture and generally had no personal voice. Mine were tighter and terser than the average, but I was still working with the industry template and not too happy about it. Alex’s script just knocked me out (not easy to do); it was both playable and literary. Written in a whole different way than standard format (laconic, elliptical, suggestive rather than explicit, bold in the implied editorial style), I thought Alex’s script was a perfect compliment to the material, hard, tough, and smart — my absolute ideals then. So much of the writing that was generally praised inside the business seemed to me soft and vastly overrated — vastly oversentimental. Then and now, I haven’t changed my opinions about that. But I have changed them about the presentational style.

“Anyway I resolved to try to go in that direction (that Alex had shown), and I worked out my own approach in the next few years. I tried to write in an extremely spare, almost haiku style, both stage directions and dialogue. Some of it was a bit pretentious — but at other times I thought it worked pretty well. I now realize a lot of this was being a young guy who wanted to throw rocks at windows.

Hard Times was the first, and I think maybe the best. Alien (1979) — the first draft, then when David [Giler] and I rewrote it, we left it in that style. The Driver, which I think was the purest script that I ever wrote, and The Warriors. The clean narrative drive of the material and the splash-panel approach to the characters perfectly fit the design I was trying to make work. Of course all this depend on the nature of the material; I don’t think the style would’ve worked at all had I been writing romantic comedies.”

“My scripts have always been a bit terse, both in stage directions and dialogue. I think I’ve loosened up in the dialogue department, but I still try to keep the descriptions fairly minimal, and in some cases purposefully minimalist. I still punctuate to effect, rather than to the proper rules of grammar. I occasionally use onomatopoeias now, a luxury I would certainly never have allowed myself when I was younger. My favorite description of the dilemma of screenwriting comes from David Giler, “Your work is only read by the people who will destroy it.” —Walter Hill

Point Blank original screenplay by Alex Jacobs [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

Summer Fun Time Reading ‘13It’s hot and the air already feels like unset Jell-O, but you still have some time to prepare for…View Post

Summer Fun Time Reading ‘13

It’s hot and the air already feels like unset Jell-O, but you still have some time to prepare for…

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